Daily Vernacularisms

Where words, ramblings and pubescence comes to die.

homewrckrs:

"I was reading a lot of books like Hollywood Babylon, focusing more on the gossipy, suicidal side of the ’30s and ’40s in Hollywood. That’s how it started, and then it grew into a real project. I just wanted to make a gimmick out of love. We’re so familiar with the idea of love in pop songs, but I didn’t want it to fall into that kind of clichéd category. So I thought I’d create Electra Heart.” insp

“When you understand, that what you’re telling is just a story. It isn’t happening anymore. When you realize the story you’re telling is just words, when you can just crumble up and throw your past in the trashcan, then we’ll figure out who you’re going to be.”

Chuck Palahniuk, Invisible Monsters

cecilwuvscarlos.tumblr.com

(via psych-facts)

Moffat: Also, if you read [The Adventure Of] Charles Augustus Milverton, Dr. Watson in the opening paragraph tells you that he’s about to tell you a porkie. He says, ‘I even now must be very reticent.’ I think what Doyle is hinting at is that Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson sat in Baker Street and said, ‘Right, we’re going to have to go and kill him, aren’t we? That’s the only way we can do this.’ So they break in, kill him, and then Dr. Watson writes up a version of the story that puts the murder [on someone else].

Gatiss: They’re hiding in their burglar masks behind the curtain, and this random woman comes and shoots Milverton in the face and then grinds her heel into his face. It’s odd, isn’t it? So I mean really, it’s just an extrapolation of saying, ‘Well, he probably did it, I think.’

Steven Moffat, Empire Interview

…Are you kidding me, Moffat and Gatiss? 

For those who aren’t familiar with the original ACD stories, “The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton” is one of the coolest, badass-lady-kicks-ass stories in canon. And here they’ve just decided that the only way that’s possible is that Watson was lying to us.

To recap the story: Holmes and Watson break into Milverton’s estate with the intention of removing the letters that Milverton has on their client, Lady Eva Blackwood. Upon breaking in, they pick the lock of the safe where Milverton keeps his letters for blackmail, and then hide behind a curtain when Milverton himself comes in. Milverton sits down in his chair and reads some legal papers for a while, and then a woman comes to the door, and it becomes evident that the two of them had prearranged this meeting. Milverton understands the woman is a maid who is prepared to sell letters that will incriminate her mistress.

It turns out, though, that the woman is actually one of Milverton’s victims; that he sent the letters he had on her to her husband, and it came as such a shock to the husband that he died of a broken heart. Furious and determined that Milverton will never victimize anyone else the same way again, the woman shoots Milverton and grinds her heel in his face.

At the time, Watson reports, he and Holmes have no idea what the woman’s identity is; at the end, Holmes has an epiphany and the story ends with Holmes showing Watson this:

"…a shop window filled with photographs of the celebrities and beauties of the day. Holmes’ eyes fixed themselves on one of them, and following his gaze I saw the picture of a regal and stately lady in Court dress, with a high diamond tiara upon her head. I looked at that delicately-curved nose, at the strong little chin beneath it. Then I caught my breath as I read the time-honoured title of the great nobleman and statesman whose wife she had been. My eyes met those of Holmes, and he put his finger to his lips as we turned away from the window."

So, let me get this straight. We have Watson telling us a completely believable story where a female character has agency for once and takes care of her own problem (and everyone else’s) by getting rid of Milverton, with perfectly good reason seeing as he’s been blackmailing everyone in town. it makes total sense that he would have shitloads of enemies and that someone would stand up to him eventually, especially if they had nothing left to lose as this woman does, and somehow that’s unbelievable? The only explanation is that Watson must have been lying to us? I’m not saying he would admit it if he and Holmes did commit murder, but the fact that he provided us with an alternative that gives us a woman with agency and an interesting, mysterious backstory makes me think that’s not the case. (Also, I take issue with Moffat’s reading of Holmes as someone who would be totally okay with murder and then letting Watson publish a story about it, but that’s a different post entirely.)

Combined with the fact that Moffat took the joy of Irene Adler beating Sherlock Holmes away from us (and then added insult to injury by having him save her as a damsel in distress), I am just too furious to speak right now. The man is apparently incapable of writing a female character with agency, who steals the spotlight away from Sherlock Holmes, ever. I can’t believe people still claim the man does not have any issues with sexism and misogyny. I absolutely cannot understand it. 

(via mymomoness)

Oh, I’d have loved to have your commentary, but I went blind with rage reading the Moffat quote.

The Milverton story is one of my favorites because it is so thoroughly about justice and the rights of victims and survivors. Gatiss called the victim/survivior “some random woman”. This is such a perfect example of the monstrosity that is this kind of ‘everyday’ misogyny.

(via tvandcomplaints)

I LOVE the Milverton story too and this makes so fucking angry that they would fuck this up. Moffat literally has NO respect for the source material all he sees is what he wants to see

(via irresistible-revolution)

nah, he respects the source material. it’s his utter lack of respect for women that’s shaping his take on the source material. damn it. (via unlockaflockofwords)

The worst thing is, the Milverton case does put both Holmes and Watson in a very interesting place, morally speaking; in there we get to see our heroes at hand with a grave dilemma, eventually letting someone get away with murder rather than give her to the law. Watson writes down the story years afterwards, once the woman “beyond the reach of human law”: at the core, the case is already a complicated and intriguing matter that, adapted for the screen, could have been made into an exploration of Sherlock’s psyche when it comes to his true rapports with justice, and since Sherlock is mainly about the protagonist’s humanity, it would have been an excellent occasion to see him struggle with empathy, leading him to renounce officially solving a case…

In His Last Vow, the only man that the Mysterious Lady, a role played here by none other than Mary (Watson), gets to shoot is the protagonist himself, making her shoot an innocent man, an ally, a friend, to protect her secrets; there is no ambiguity whatsoever as to her morality or the validity of her choices: she is plain wrong, and guilty of not trusting our heroes—both of them—if not downright unintelligent. And instead, we get Sherlock in the end shooting the blackmailer Magnussen to protect her future with his best friend, a completely selfless act that removes all manner of moral interrogation entirely (which is doubly problematic since our hero has just killed a man, and not out of self-defence, but that would be the topic for another conversation).

(via helshades)

So, maybe we’re the
generation of the selfie,
but we’re also the generation
that grew up in a tainted,
Photoshopped world
with every impossible beauty standard
shoved down our throat
through a tube
because eating has become
a guilty pleasure
and condemning beauty ideals
won’t go straight to our thighs.

And if, by chance,
we are able to destroy the
demons that you’ve planted
inside of us with your
constant advertisements and rules
that play behind our eyelids and
take root in our brains,
then let us take our fucking pictures
and capture that moment when
we felt beautiful because all this world
has taught us is that
our beauty is the greatest
measure of our worth.

Scoff at our phones all you like,
these delicate extensions of
our fingers, but know that
through this technology
that you couldn’t even
begin to understand,
we have smudged the entire
world with our fingerprints.
We are the generation of knowledge,
and we are learning more than
any that came before us.
So, frown at my typing fingers;
I am using them to grasp power
by the throat.

Try to invalidate us,
but we’ve heard our
parents talking about
the world’s crashing and burning
since we had sprung from the womb.
We know you’ve fucked up,
and we’re angry about it-
the kind of anger that
fuels knowledge,
that I feel in my veins every time
I read the news from my phone
before school,
that sticks in my throat like honey
in a debate;
the kind of anger that simmers,
that sharpens teeth into daggers,
that makes this generation more dangerous
than you could have ever imagined.

We are the generation of change,
and goddammit, we’re coming.

– Emily Palermo, An Open Letter to the Men Who Told Me to Stay Out of Adult Conversations (via starredsoul)

Beyond Earth Stephen Di Donato

"After recently finding old science fiction magazines dating back from the 1980’s, it reignited my childhood memories of my curiosity of our solar system and of limitless imagination. I began researching heavily on NASA missions and came to the realization that the late 1950’s to mid-1970’s were exciting times for new discoveries, for real photographic images of planets and for limitless possibilities. This gave me the incentive to start a personal project named Beyond Earth."


Alexa Chung, Daisy Lowe, Pixie Geldof attend the British Fashion Awards 2013 at London Coliseum

Alexa Chung, Daisy Lowe, Pixie Geldof attend the British Fashion Awards 2013 at London Coliseum